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Day One:
Icelandic Ponies
Norse Attack
Fjörugardurrin
Blue Lagoon

Day Two:
Black Sand Beach
Sea Kayaking
Stokkseyri
Whitewater Rafting
Skidaskalínn
NightClubs

Day Three:
Jökulsárlón
Jöklasel
Midfellsegg
Idno
Clubbing Again

Day Four:
Apótek
Back Home

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Looking towards the Trofallos gorge

Left: The riders rest near the waterfall Trofallos

Right: Looking over the gorge into the waterfall

Up again at noon, we congregated downstairs in the hotel lobby to board the bus for lunch at Laxnes farm. On the way, Inga pointed out that salmon fishing was very popular in Iceland. As we crossed over a large river, she noted that this was one of the largest salmon rivers in the country, the Ellidaár. The bus headed out into the countryside, with Faxa Bay and Mt. Esja in the background.

Arriving at the farm, the group was herded into a large tent for barbecue and Icelandic beer. Larry Harding, VP Advertising Sales, from the Eastern Region Discovery Channel office, greeted us with a warm welcome, and introduced the catering team amid a backdrop of green pastures, mountains and Icelandic ponies. A photographer was also on hand to capture the adventures of our merry tourist band.


Trevor & Johna Hewes relaxing at Trofallos

After lunch, wranglers outfitted each of us with helmets and a sturdy steed. Karyn and I, experienced riders that we are, drew spirited horses. Riding in Iceland was English style, not the Western saddles we were accustomed to. Outfitting the group took a few minutes, and then we were off, fording a small, lively stream, and heading into the mountains along a narrow track.

Fields of hay, pastures, and a small country club all bordered the trail. On the left, the volcanic mountains of Southwestern Iceland dominated the landscape. The ponies half-trot, half-canter is a gait unique to the Icelandic horse, and makes them riding a pleasure. Like some Mongolian breeds, the Icelandic pony has five gaits: fet (walk), brokk (trot), stökk (gallop), skeid (pace) and the aforementioned tölt (running walk).

 

 

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